Song Review: “Fight Like A Girl” by Kalie Shorr

Great songs have one thing in common: they are more than just another song. They carry a punch, a undeniable message that simply demands to be heard. Kalie Shorr’s song “Fight Like A Girl” is one of those songs.

I first saw Kalie Shorr at the Music City Center in Nashville during the CMA Music Festival 2015. I’ve been hearing her song a lot on Sirius radio. If not for Sirius, a song like “Fight Like A Girl” might not get a lot of release outside of songwriter events in Nashville. They people have spoken. After hearing this song, so many people have liked and shared the song on social media. People voted for this song on Taste of Country’s Showdown five nights in a row against artists like Reba McEntire, which earned the song retired status.

Why are so many people getting behind this song? It’s because the song is important. It carries a good message. No, it carries a phenomenal messages. The song’s first verse makes it clear the narrator is a strong woman and she make no apologies for that. Shorr sings, “But what he doesn’t know, is Iʼve got a slingshot and a stone/ And I can win with no one in my corner/ So donʼt you even try to hold me back.” As powerful as those lines are, they serve primarily as a set-up for the even more powerful chorus where she turns to cliché “fight like a girl” around. The phrase doesn’t imply weakness when it comes out of Shorr’s mouth. She sings, “I might fall down, but I get back up/ I shine brightest when the goingʼs tough/ You say I canʼt, well darling watch me/ You canʼt stop me/ Cause I fight like a girl.” I really don’t think there’s been such a positive song for females in a while. There’s certainly not enough of them and “Fight Like A Girl” helps fill that void.

Make no mistake – “Fight Like A Girl” is more than a song. Shorr is a great songwriter and a promising singer. The lyrics of “Fight Like A Girl” are powerful, but they would fall flat if not for a strong female voice delivering them. When I listen to the words, I can hear the frustration and the hope combined in Shorr’s voice. After hearing her sing this song, I couldn’t imagine it being performed by anyone else.

 

 

Eric Lee Beddingfield